Admittedly, one of the best parts of playing Control Warrior is being able to get away with playing minions that are largely too greedy to be ran in other classes. Nefarian is probably the best example of this. You normally don't see him in any kind of Dragon deck, Priest or otherwise, he's really only utilized in that one specific archetype. And though he'll remain when Hearthstone is updated to cycle out Naxxramas and Goblins vs. Gnomes, some of the tools you've come to rely upon have been removed from the equation. We've assembled what cards are being eliminated from his pool and will be examining these to see whether or not it will help increase or decrease the quality of cards you're likely to get.

Druid

Good

Poison Seeds - We'd argue that the loss of this one is a good thing. Against aggro decks which flood the board this essentially becomes a dead card that just takes up space in your hand.

Neutral

Dark Wispers - Usually too slow/expensive, even for Control decks. It's not worthless however, and better than some of the other possibilities out there.

Bad

Tree of Life - Prior to Reno Jackson there was nothing quite comparable to stealing a Tree of Life when you're playing against a deck that's faster than yours, especially if you were close to defeat.
Recycle - Though it's not the best hard removal spell out there, it's still a sure way of dealing with a problematic minion on your opponent's field.

Hunter

Good

Call Pet - Just a two mana draw a card, could get much, much better.

Neutral

Feign Death - Most of the time this is just so-so, but due to the combo power with cards like Sylvanas Windrunner, this is both good and bad.

Bad

Cobra Shot - Great against aggro decks if you've survived that long!

Mage

Bad

Duplicate, Echo of Medivh, Unstable Portal, Flamecannon - All of these are tough to lose. The first two help you keep your hand stocked full of useful and troublesome minions while the latter can help you relieve some pressure while still maintaining your board presence.

Paladin

Neutral

Muster for Battle - Helps establish a board presence at the very least, just not very powerful late in the game.
Seal of Light - Control decks love healing and direct removal.
Avenge - Avenge helps your minions remain sticky and troublesome, frequently forcing the opponent to deal with them and potentially running them out of steam. However, it can be pretty lackluster in mirror matches.

Priest

Bad

Lightbomb, Light of the Naaru, Velen's Chosen - Bad, bad, bad. Even Light of the Naaru which has limited value in the late game is pretty good, especially if you're a Priest or have heals built into your deck. Lightbomb in particular is a pretty big exclusion as it's one of the best board wipes available to Control decks.

Rogue

Bad

Sabotage - Hard removal, including your opponent's weapon if you can pull off the combo.
Tinker's Sharpsword Oil - One of the best bursting spells in the game, especially if you're playing a class that has weapons.

Shaman

Neutral

Reincarnate - Situationally useful. Good for restoring your taunt minions to full health or activating powerful deathrattles.
Ancestor's Call - Great against aggro decks, not so much in mirror matches.

Bad

Crackle - Targeted damage is good!

Warlock

Neutral

Demonheart - Unless you're playing something along the lines of Renolock, it's unlikely you'll ever activate the buff. Outside of that it's simply an overcosted damage spell.

Bad

Imp-losion - Removal and board presence in one? Sounds great for my Control deck.
Darkbomb - Targeted damage again.

Warrior

Neutral

Bouncing Blade - Not the greatest against Aggro decks.
Crush - A bit overpriced for removal, but at last it gets the job done.

Tallying those up we get:
  • Good: 2
  • Neutral: 10
  • Bad: 11
And while the removal of these spells has varying effects on the actual matchup depending on things like the remaining overall quality of spells, needless to say, Nefarian is losing some very valuable possibilities and we'll be looking for the next set of cards to help replenish them. Keep in mind, we're due for a full expansion, not an adventure. Goblins vs. Gnomes added eight cards per class while the Grand Tournament opted for nine. We can probably expect a similar number of cards this time around with a particular focus on Druid and Mage spells which stand to lose the highest number of cards out of all nine classes.